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Graphs and tables

Our locations

Figure 1: Map of Department of Education and Training - Queensland regions (as at May 2010)

Map of Department of Education and Training - Queensland regions (as at May 2010)

Map showing the Department of Education and Training - Queensland regions

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Our legislation

Table 1: Administrative Arrangements Order (No.2) 2009

Principal responsibilities Acts administered by the Department of Education and Training

Early Childhood Education and Care

Education including:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
  • Continuing Education
  • Distance Education
  • Education of Students of Non-English Speaking Background
  • Education of Students in Youth Detention Centres
  • Preschool Education
  • Primary Education
  • Secondary Education
  • Special Education

Higher Education including:

  • State Government Policy and Planning

Kindergarten funding

Non-State School Funding

Registration of Teachers

Smart State Education Initiatives

Vocational Education and Training including Technical and Further Education

Australian Catholic University (Queensland) Act 2007
Bond University Act 1987
Child Care Act 2002
Central Queensland University Act 1998
Community Services Act 2007 (Parts 1 to 9, 11 to 13 and Schedules 1 to 4) (jointly administered with the Minister for Local Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, Minister for Community Services and Housing and Minister for Women, Minister for Disability Services and Multicultural Affairs)
Education (Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Act 2001
Education (Capital Assistance) Act 1993
Education (General Provisions) Act 2006
Education (Overseas Students) Act 1996
Education (Queensland College of Teachers) Act 2005
Education (Queensland Studies Authority) Act 2002
Education (Work Experience) Act 1996
Grammar Schools Act 1975
Griffith University Act 1998
Higher Education (General Provisions) Act 2008
James Cook University Act 1997
Queensland University of Technology Act 1998
University of Queensland Act 1998
University of Southern Queensland Act 1998
University of the Sunshine Coast Act 1998
Vocational Education, Training and Employment Act 2000

Source: Queensland Parliament

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Organisational structure

Figure 2: Department of Education and Training organisational structure

Department of Education and Training organisational structure

Department of Education and Training - organisational structure

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Supporting government objectives

Figure 3: Supporting government objectives for the community

Supporting government objectives for the community

Diagram outling DET's work in supporting government objectives for the community

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Chief Finance Officer report

Table 2: Financial snapshot

Financial snapshot

2009-10
$(000)

2008-09
$(000)

2007-08
$(000)

2006-07
$(000)

2005-06
$(000)

Controlled revenue

  • Departmental services revenue

6 361 623

5 434 806

4 845 846

4 461 478

3 752 162

  • Other revenue

688 447

1 154 354

1 275 176

1 117 747

733 054

Controlled expenses

7 048 818

6 588 438

6 120 394

5 530 523

4 474 541

Operating surplus/(deficit)

1 252

722

628

48 702

10 675

Administered grants

614 699

751 606

668 111

655 699

684 401

Capital outlays

2 063 375

680 344

674 710

652 911

533 208

Total assets

18 423 318

17 470 605

16 871 239

15 485 397

12 205 538

Total liabilities

1 241 759

957 913

937 659

721 626

586 308

Net assets/(liabilities)

17 181 559

16 512 692

15 933 580

14 763 771

11 619 230

Employee expenses ($000)

4 981 683

4 718 681

4 429 245

3 934 980

3 346 039

Number of employees
at 30 June (FTE)

65 829

63 732

63 445

61 972

54 910

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes:

  1. Due to machinery-of-government changes, Early Childhood Education and Care functions were transferred from the Department of Communities on 1 January 2009. On 31 March 2009, Arts Queensland (including Corporate Administration Agency) was transferred to the Department of the Premier and Cabinet.
  2. Due to machinery-of-government changes in 2006, Training is included in figures from 2006-07.

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Our income

Figure 4: Income

Income

Graph showing income sources 2009-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Our expenses

Figure 5: Expenses

Expenses

Graph showing DET expenditure 2009-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 6: Average cost per student in state schools

Average cost per student in state schools

Graph showing average cost per student in state schools

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Our assets

Figure 7: Value of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

Value of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets

Graph showing trends in value of DET assets 2005-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Disclosure of budget vs actual

Table 3: Operating statement for the year ended June 2010

Controlled items - Parent entity

Notes

2009-10 actual
$'000

2009-10 budget
$'000

Variation
(%)

Income

Revenue

  • Output revenue

1

6 361 623

6 666 656

-5%

  • User charges

204 009

167 849

22%

  • Grants and other contributions

332 084

266 839

24%

  • Other revenues

152 354

115 985

31%

Total income

7 050 070

7 217 329

-2%

 

  • Employee expenses

4 981 683

4 782 232

4%

  • Supplies and services

2

1 320 155

1 774 083

-26%

  • Grants and subsidies

245 275

239 776

2%

  • Depreciation and amortisation

3

413 394

337 347

23%

  • Other expenses

61 038

53 607

14%

  • Finance/borrowing costs

27 273

30 284

-10%

Total expenses

7 048 818

7 217 329

-2%

Operating surplus/(deficit) continuing operations

1 252

-

N/a

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes:

The variances for these controlled items can be explained as follows:

  1. The decrease is mainly due to the transfer of recurrent funding for the Australian Government Building the Education Revolution (BER) program to capital, which is partly offset by increased funding for depreciation due to a re-assessment of asset useful lives.
  2. The decrease is mainly due to reduced recurrent outlays for the BER program, offset by increased capital expenditure.
  3. The increase is mainly due to increased depreciation due to a re-assessment of asset useful lives.

Table 4: Balance sheet as at 30 June 2010

Notes

2010 Actual
$'000

2010 Budget
$'000

Variation (1)
(%)

Current assets

  • Cash and cash equivalents

1

550 175

390 020

41%

  • Receivables

2

140 021

78 928

77%

  • Inventories

2 776

2 560

8%

  • Other current assets

74 237

97 654

-24%

  • Non-current assets classified as held for sale

3

81 930

40 315

103%

Total current assets

849 139

609 477

39%

 

Non-current assets

  • Property, plant and equipment

 

17 521 801

17 544 024

0%

  • Intangible assets

4

52 378

12 908

306%

Total non-current assets

 

17 574 179

17 556 932

0%

 

Total Assets

 

18 423 318

18 166 409

1%

 

  • Payables

5

751 907

502 356

50%

  • Accrued employee benefits

6

125 773

11 915

956%

  • Other financial liabilities

7

2 280

80 596

-97%

  • Provisions

 

-

745

N/a

  • Other

 

72 233

109 910

-34%

Total current liabilities

 

952 193

705 522

35%

 

  • Interest bearing liabilities

7

289 566

318 345

-9%

  • Provisions

 

-

304

N/a

Total non-current liabilities

 

289 566

318 649

-9%

 

Total Liabilities

 

1 241 759

1 024 171

21%

 

Net Assets

 

17 181 559

17 142 238

0%

 

  • Contributed equity

8

4 031 790

3 837 415

5%

  • Retained surpluses

 

41 724

37 112

12%

  • Asset revaluation reserve

 

13 108 045

13 267 711

-1%

Total Equity

 

17 181 559

17 142 238

0%

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes:

The variances for these controlled items can be explained as follows:

  1. The variance is mainly due to: a) increase in capital payables associated with the Australian Government Building the Education Revolution (BER) program; and b) increase in school bank balances.
  2. The variance is mainly due to higher GST receivables due to increased payments under the capital works program, including for the BER program.
  3. The variance is mainly due to increases in the number of properties classified as held for sale.
  4. The variance is mainly due to recognition of the upgrades to the TAFE Institute Student Administration System (ISAS).
  5. The variance is mainly due to increases in capital creditors due to increased activity associated with programs such as BER and State Schools of Tomorrow.
  6. The variance is mainly due to the requirement in the financial statements to treat payables for Annual Leave Central scheme and Long Service Levy as accrued employee benefits instead of payables.
  7. The decrease is mainly due to deferral of borrowings and progressive uptake of the South East Queensland Schools Public Private Partnership financial arrangements.
  8. The increase is mainly due to the transfer of recurrent funding for the BER program to capital, which is partly offset by increased recurrent funding for depreciation due to a re-assessment of asset useful lives.

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Giving children a flying start: Performance measures

Table 5: Performance measures - Early Childhood Education and Care

Performance measures

Notes

2009-10
target/est.

2009-10
est. actual

Early Childhood Education and Care

Number of child care licensing transactions undertaken

1

1700

2015

Percentage of licensed child care services receiving at least one visit per year from the Office for Early Childhood Education and Care

 

98%

98%

Number of compliance notices issued to licensed and stand-alone child care services

1

70

64

Percentage of complaints relating to serious safety breaches in licensed child care services that are responded to by the Office within two working days

 

100%

100%

Source: Queensland State Budget 2010-11 Service Delivery Statements and the Performance, Monitoring and Reporting branch, Department of Education and Training

Note:

  1. Activity measures have been discontinued in the SDS to accurately reflect the government's transition to service standards with greater focus on efficiency and effectiveness.

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A kindergarten program for all

Table 6: Bilateral agreement on achieving universal access to early childhood education comparing current to 2008-09 baseline data

Early Childhood Education Program Performance Benchmarks

Baseline

2009 target

2009 actual

The proportion of children who are enrolled in a quality kindergarten program

29%

30%

32%

The proportion of enrolments in a quality kindergarten program:

  • Indigenous children

29%1

29%1

33%1

25%2

27%2

  • Children in disadvantaged communities

38%

42%

52%

The number of teachers delivering a kindergarten program who are four-year university trained (or equivalent)
and early childhood qualified

600

630

892

The average number of hours per week of attendance at a quality kindergarten program

12.8

12.8

13.7

Source: 2009 Queensland Annual Report Bilateral Agreement on Achieving Universal Access to Early Childhood Education

Note:

  1. These figures are based on the 2006 Australian Bureau of Statistics Census.
  2. These figures are based on the ABS Experimental Estimates and Projections Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 1991-2027, which provides a more accurate reflection of the Indigenous population than the 2006 census data previously used.

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Laying strong educational foundations: Performance measures - state schooling

Table 7: Performance measures - Early Phase of Learning, Middle Phase of Learning, Students with disabilities

Performance measures

Notes

2009-10
target/est.

2009-10
est. actual

Early Phase of Learning

Number of students in the Early Phase of Learning

1, 2

145 890

147 380

Number of Preparatory Year students:

1

 

 

  • total

 

40 600

41 530

  • Indigenous

3

3 360

3 610

Proportion of Queensland Preparatory students enrolled in state Preparatory Year classes

1

71%

70%

Proportion of Queensland Preparatory to Year 3 students attending state schools

1

70%

70%

Year 2 Diagnostic Net - Percentage of Year 2 students mapped who did not require intervention in relation to their literacy and numeracy development:

4

 

 

  • all:

 

 

 

    • reading

 

76%

75.2%

    • writing

 

86%

84.2%

    • number

 

82%

81.8%

  • Indigenous:

3

 

 

    • reading

 

56%

50.7%

    • writing

 

66%

61.2%

    • number

 

61%

57.1%

Year 3 Test - Percentage of students at or above the National Minimum Standard:

5, 6

 

 

  • all:

 

 

 

    • reading

 

89%

90.7%

    • writing

 

92%

90.3%

    • numeracy

 

91%

87.8%

  • Indigenous:

3

 

 

    • reading

 

69%

78.4%

    • writing

 

74%

75.7%

    • numeracy

 

73%

69.1%

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school

7

90%

89.4%

Average cost of service per student ($)

8

10 780

10 270

Middle Phase of Learning

Number of students in the Middle Phase of Learning

1, 2

239 890

237 160

Proportion of Queensland students in Years 4 to 9 attending state schools

 

68%

67%

Year 5 Test - Percentage of students at or above the National Minimum Standard:

5, 6

 

 

  • all:

 

 

 

    • reading

 

86%

85.5%

    • writing

 

89%

86.3%

    • numeracy

 

90%

91.8%

  • Indigenous:

3

 

 

    • reading

 

60%

65.5%

    • writing

 

70%

67%

    • numeracy

 

70%

77.2%

Year 7 Test - Percentage of students at or above the National Minimum Standard:

5, 6

 

 

  • all:

 

 

 

    • reading

 

93%

90.4%

    • writing

 

89%

88.6%

    • numeracy

 

95%

93.1%

  • Indigenous:

3

 

 

    • reading

 

76%

73.3%

    • writing

 

72%

71.6%

    • numeracy

 

85%

78.9%

Year 9 Test - Percentage of students at or above the National Minimum Standard:

5, 6

 

 

  • all:

 

 

 

    • reading

 

90%

85.2%

    • writing

 

84%

82.1%

    • numeracy

 

92%

93.1%

  • Indigenous:

3

 

 

    • reading

 

72%

64.8%

    • writing

 

63%

62%

    • numeracy

 

75%

81.3%

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school

7

85%

82.5%

Satisfaction of students with their school

7

79%

77.7%

Percentage of students continuing schooling across the key juncture - Year 7 to Year 8:

9

 

 

  • all

 

91%

89%

  • Indigenous

3

94%

92%

Average cost of service per student ($)

8

10 559

10 415

Students with disabilities

Number of state special schools

1, 10

43

43

Number of students in special schools

1

3 325

3 390

Number of state schools providing special education programs

1

583

583

Number of students with disabilities identified as needing specialist support who are enrolled in state primary and secondary schools

1

19 090

20 230

Number of students with disabilities who have:

 

 

 

  • been awarded a Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement

 

540

496

  • completed 12 years of schooling

 

1 030

910

Satisfaction of parents with their child's:

7

 

 

  • special school

 

93%

93%

  • state school

 

84%

78.2%

Average cost of service per student ($)

8

27 127

26 152

Source: Queensland State Budget 2010-11 Service Delivery Statements

Notes:

  1. Activity measures have been discontinued in the SDS to accurately reflect the government's transition to service standards with greater focus on efficiency and effectiveness.
  2. Student enrolments in state schools of distance education are distributed across the Early, Middle and Senior Phase of learning outputs according to year level.
  3. This is based on self-identified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.
  4. In 2009, 24 966 students participated in the Year 2 Diagnostic Net.
  5. The first national tests for literacy and numeracy were conducted in May 2008.
  6. The estimated actual is an estimate and the errors bounds are not reported.
  7. This measure is based on information provided by parents/caregivers and students in the School Opinion Survey, administered in all State schools in August 2009. Satisfaction is calculated as those respondents either satisfied or very satisfied.
  8. Now provided as average cost per student in (i) prep and primary (ii) secondary and (iii) students with disabilities.
  9. This measure relates to the key juncture from Year 7 to Year 8 and shows the proportion of students making the transition from state primary schooling to state secondary schooling within Queensland.
  10. This measure includes 42 special schools and 1 special campus (Innisfail State College).

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Laying strong educational foundations: Performance measures - non-state schooling

Table 8: Performance measures - Non-state education

Performance measures

Notes

2009-10
target/est.

2009-10
est. actual

Non-state education

Number of operating non-state schools in Queensland

1

472

467

Number of non-state students in the:

1

 

 

  • Early Phase of Learning
    (Preparatory to Year 3)

 

63 500

64 220

  • Middle Phase of Learning
    (Years 4 to 9)

 

114 970

116 260

  • Senior Phase of Learning
    (Years 10 to 12)

 

63 200

61 460

Number of applications received by the Non-State Schools Accreditation Board for:

2

 

 

  • establishing new non-state schools

 

6

3

  • existing non-state schools to add type of education

3

5

1

  • existing non-state schools to change accreditation attribute

4

20

17

Number of applications for government funding of non-state schools received by the Non-State Schools Eligibility for Government Funding Committee

2

15

9

Number of applications received for registration as a provider of courses for overseas students

1

35

33

Non-state schools involved in the cyclical review process:

 

 

 

  • percentage reviewed

5

96%

97%

  • of those reviewed, percentage complying with the legislated criteria

 

100%

100%

Number of notices issued by the Non-State Schools Accreditation Board

6

NA

18

Percentage of applicants for re-registration as course providers to overseas students approved

7

NA

NA

Source: Queensland State Budget 2010-11 Service Delivery Statements

Notes:

  1. Activity measures have been discontinued in the SDS to accurately reflect the government's transition to service standards with greater focus on efficiency and effectiveness.
  2. The number of applications is subject to strategic decisions of school governing bodies.
  3. A type of education is defined in s.12 of the Education (Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Act 2001 to mean primary education, secondary education or special education.
  4. Attributes are defined in section 16 (3) of the Education (Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Act 2001 and include items such as governing body, the curriculum model the school is to follow, boarding facilities, etc.
  5. This measure indicates the percentage of non-state schools that have completed a cyclic review in the previous five years.
  6. This measure is for compliance notices, show cause notices, and notices to cancel accreditation, and it is not appropriate to set a target, as this will be determined solely by due process and reported as Estimated Actual for 2009-10.
  7. This new performance measure was due to be reported in the 2009 -10 DET Annual Report. However, no applications for re-registration were approved in the reporting year due to delays in amendments to the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000.

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Early Phase of Learning

Table 9: Number of students in the Early Phase of Learning in state schools

Number of students in Early Phase of Learning (Years P-3)

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Total

144 290

144 410

145 130

147 380

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

Figure 8: Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Early Phase of Learning (Prep - Year 3)

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Early Phase of Learning (Prep - Year 3)

Bar graph showing satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Early Phase of Learning (Prep - Year 3)

Source: School Opinion Survey - Department of Education and Training

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Middle Phase of Learning

Table 10: Number of students in the Middle Phase of Learning in state schools

Number of students - Middle Phase of Learning (Years 4-9)

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Total

237 420

238 580

239 760

237 160

Proportion enrolled in state schools

69%

69%

68%

67%

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

Figure 9: Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Middle Phase of Learning (Years 4-9)

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Middle Phase of Learning (Years 4-9)

Bar graph showing satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Middle Phase of Learning (Years 4-9)

Source: School Opinion Survey - Department of Education and Training

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Literacy, numeracy and science

Figure 10: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Reading comparative data: Queensland & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Reading comparative data: Queensland & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from all schools (state and non-state) at or above the national minimum standard in reading, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 11: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Writing comparative data:Queensland & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Writing comparative data:Queensland & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from all schools (state and non-state) at or above the national minimum standard in writing, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 12: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Numeracy comparative data: Queensland & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Numeracy comparative data: Queensland & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from all schools (state and non-state) at or above the national minimum standard in numeracy, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 13: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Reading comparative data: Queensland state schools & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Reading comparative data: Queensland state schools & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from state schools at or above the national minimum standard in reading, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 14: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Writing comparative data:Queensland state schools & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Writing comparative data:Queensland state schools & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from state schools at or above the national minimum standard in writing, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 15: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Numeracy comparative data: Queensland state schools & Australia

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 Numeracy comparative data: Queensland state schools & Australia

Graph showing percentage of Queensland students from state schools at or above the national minimum standard in numeracy 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

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Student support

Table 11: Summary data - students with disabilities

Students with disabilities

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Number of state schools providing special education programs

495

486

573

583

Number of students with disabilities identified as needing specialist support enrolled in state primary and secondary schools

15 282

16 410

17 846

20 230

Number of students in special schools

2950

3050

3300

3 390

Number of state special schools 1

47

47

47

43

Source: Department of Education and Training

Note:

  1. During 2010, the Mater Hospital School, the Royal Brisbane Hospital School, the Barrett Adolescent Centre and the Tennyson Special School, previously classified as Special Schools, were reclassified as Special Purpose Schools. This reduced the Special School count by four. The 43 Special Schools include Innisfail State College - Diverse Learning Centre, a special campus of Innisfail State College.

Figure 16: Parent satisfaction with their child's school - students with disabilities attending a state school

Parent satisfaction with their child's school - students with disabilities attending a state school

Graph showing satisfaction of parents with their child's school - students with disabilities attending a state school

Source: School Opinion Survey - Department of Education and Training

Figure 17: Parent satisfaction with their child's school - students with disabilities attending a special school

Parent satisfaction with their child's school - students with disabilities attending a special school

Graph showing satisfaction of parentswith their child's school - students with disabilities attending a special school

Source: School Opinion Survey - Department of Education and Training

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Student wellbeing

Table 29: School Disciplinary Absences - By reason of absence - Term 3 2009 to Term 2 2010

Reason

Short Suspension

Long Suspension

Exclusion

Cancellation

Total Incidents

Avg. rate per 1000 students per term

Total Incidents

Avg. rate per 1000 students per term

Total Incidents

Avg. rate per 1000 students per term

Total Incidents

Avg. rate per 1000 students per term

Absences

1 111

0.6

107

0.1

6

0.0

-

-

Other conduct prejudicial to the good order and management of the school (including serious conduct)

7 743

3.9

1 339

0.7

235

0.1

-

-

Persistently disruptive behaviour adversely affecting others

5 021

2.6

624

0.3

62

0.0

-

-

Physical Misconduct

17 912

9.1

2 496

1.3

373

0.2

-

-

Property Misconduct

3 560

1.8

484

0.2

50

0.0

-

-

Refusal to participate in the program of instruction

3 566

1.8

276

0.1

21

0.0

681

0.3

Substance Misconduct involving tobacco and other legal substances

2 801

1.4

293

0.1

27

0.0

-

-

Substance Misconduct involving an illicit substance

229

0.1

298

0.2

121

0.1

-

-

Verbal or Non Verbal Misconduct

12 673

6.5

1 162

0.6

86

0.0

-

-

Grand Total

54 616

27.8

7 079

3.6

981

0.5

681

0.3

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes

  1. 0.0 rounded to 0.0 (if less than 0.05)
  2. -- Nil
  3. School disciplinary absence (SDA) data was collected centrally from Term 4 2002 to Term 2 2009 through the School Disciplinary Absence Collection (SDAC) system. This is the final year that the SDAC system will provide this data. From Term 3 2009, OneSchool became the sole source of behavioural management data for state schools. The SDA data presented comprises the total of short suspensions (1-5 days), long suspensions (6-20 days), suspensions with recommendation for exclusion, and cancellations of enrolment.
  4. The enrolments used to calculate the SDA rates for Term 3 2009 were based on August 2009 enrolment data; SDA rates for Term 4 2009 were based on November 2009 enrolment data; and SDA rates for Terms 1 and 2 2010 were based on February 2010 enrolment data.
  5. The information is displayed in terms of aggregate incident counts and the rate of SDAs per 1000 students. The data does not represent the outcomes of any related appeal decisions.
    Incidents: Count of incidents of SDAs from Term 3 2009 to Term 2 2010.
    Rate per 1000 students: An effective average number of SDA incidents per 1000 students per term for the reporting period. Due to rounding, discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals in the average rate per 1000 figures.
  6. School year counts of incidents by type of absence for individual schools were published through each school's annual report on individual school websites from 2010. When aggregated, this data may differ from summary figures displayed above due to the information being reported across different time periods (school year versus financial year) and the results of a school-driven validation process.
  7. Due to rounding, discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals in the average rate per thousand figures.

Table 12: Summary of directions and orders - Queensland schools

Type of direction or order

Directions or orders given to personnel other than children
2009-10

Directions or orders given to children
2009-10

State and non-state schools

Prohibition from entering premises of all state educational institutions and non-state schools for up to one year - section 352

0

0

State schools

Direction about conduct or movement - section 337

 

157

13

Direction to leave and not re-enter - section 339

5

4

Prohibition from entering premises for up to 60 days - section 340

4

0

Prohibition from entering premises for more than 60 days but not more than one year - section 341

0

0

Review of direction - section 338:

 

 

  • the number of review applications made

11

1

  • the number of directions confirmed

9

1

  • the number of directions cancelled

2

0

Prohibition from entering premises of all state education institutions for up to one year - section 353

0

0

Type of direction or order

Directions or orders given to personnel other than children

Directions or orders given to children

 

2008-09

2009-10

2008-09

2009-10

Non-state schools

Direction about conduct or movement - section 346

13

36

0

21

Direction to leave and not re-enter - section 348

2

1

0

0

Prohibition from entering premises for up to 60 days - section 349

8

9

0

0

Prohibition from entering premises for more than 60 days but not more than one year - section 350

0

0

0

0

Review of direction - section 346-347:

1

0

0

0

  • the number of review applications made

1

0

0

0

  • the number of directions confirmed

1

0

0

0

  • the number of directions cancelled

0

0

0

0

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes:

  1. Previous annual reports have reported non-state schools information for the previous financial year. This annual report provides non-state schools information for the 2009-10 financial year, bringing non-state schools and state schools in line for the first time.
  2. Sections refer to the Education (General Provisions) Act 2006, Chapter 12, Parts 6-8.

^ Top of page

Strong futures for Indigenous students

Figure 18: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Reading comparative data:Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Reading comparative data:Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from all schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in reading, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 19: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from all schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in writing 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 20: NAPLAN 2008 and 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 and 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from all schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in numeracy, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 21: NAPLAN 2008 and 2009 - Reading comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 and 2009 - Reading comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from state schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in reading, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 22: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from state schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in writing, 2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 23: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland students & Queensland state school Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of Queensland Indigenous students from state schools at or above national minimum standard compared with all Queensland students in numeracy-2008-09

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 24: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Reading comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Reading comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of all Queensland Indigenous students compared with Australian Indigenous students, at or above the national minimum standard in reading, 2008-2009

Figure 25: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Writing comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of all Queensland Indigenous students compared with Australian Indigenous students, at or above the national minimum standard in writing, 2008-2009

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

Figure 26: NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

NAPLAN 2008 & 2009 - Numeracy comparative data: Queensland Indigenous students & Australian Indigenous students

Graph showing percentage of all Queensland Indigenous students compared with Australian Indigenous students, at or above the national minimum standard in numeracy, 2008-2009

Source: Data is drawn from NAPLAN - National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy Stage II Data

^ Top of page

Non-state education

Table 13: Number of students in Queensland non-state schools

Students in Queensland non-state schools

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Early Phase

57 230

59 710

61 620

64 220

Middle Phase

104 780

108 550

111 840

116 260

Senior Phase

57 610

60 390

61 460

61 460

Total

219 620

228 650

234 920

241 940

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

Table 14: Non-state schools involved in the cyclical review process

Non-state schools

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Number of non-state schools accredited in Queensland

465

467

466

467

Percentage of schools reviewed in the cyclical review process

58

73

96.2

97

Percentage of schools reviewed that complied with legislated criteria

100

100

100

100

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

^ Top of page

Developing skills for the economy: Performance measures

Table 15: Performance measures - Senior Phase of Learning, Vocational education and training, Higher education

Performance measures

Notes

2009-10
target/est.

2009-10
est. actual

Senior Phase of Learning

Number of students in the Senior Phase of Learning

1, 2

99 130

100 720

Proportion of Queensland students in Years 10 to 12 attending state schools

1

61%

62%

Apparent retention rate from Year 10 to Year 12:

1

 

 

  • total

 

74%

76%

  • male

 

70%

73%

  • female

 

77%

80%

  • Indigenous

 

60%

58%

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school

3

81%

77.7%

Satisfaction of students with their school

3

67%

63.7%

Percentage of students who, six months after completing Year 12, are participating in education, training or employment

4, 5, 6, 7

new

87.1%

Percentage of students awarded a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) by the end of Year 12

8

69%

71.1%

Percentage of OP/International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD) eligible students with an OP 1-15 or IBD

8

67%

66.9%

Percentage of students with VET qualifications (who completed Year 12)

1

63%

67.9%

Percentage of Year 12 students who are completing or completed a school-based apprenticeship and traineeship (SAT) or were awarded one or more of the following: QCE, IBD, VET qualification

 

90%

89.6%

Average cost of service per student ($)

9

12 354

12 056

Vocational education and training (VET) services

Commencements for apprentices and trainees:

 

 

 

  • total

1

58 000

58 500

  • apprentices

4,10

new

16 500

  • trainees

4,10

new

42 000

  • school-based apprentices and trainees

4,11

new

8 700

  • 15-17 year olds

1,12

16 000

14 700

Number of apprentices and trainees in training

1,13

93 000

92 500

VET participation - total number of VET students:

 

 

 

  • VET (all)

1,14

300 000

280 300

  • total TAFE

1,15

206 000

183 700

  • Cert III and above

1,16,17

202 000

191 700

  • higher level training (Cert IV and above)

1,17

66 500

73 400

  • mature age

 

54 000

48 800

  • 15-17 year olds

1,18

49 000

46 300

  • Number of 15-19 year olds enrolled in VET at Certificate II and above

4,19

new

71 800

  • Number of Indigenous 15-19 year olds enrolled in VET at Certificate II and above

4,19

new

3 900

VET outcomes

 

 

 

Total qualifications completed:

 

 

 

  • VET (all)

1,14

98 000

112 400

  • Cert III and above

 

61 000

64 600

Number of students completing Certificate III and above

4,20

new

57 600

Number of Indigenous students completing Certificate III and above

4,21

new

2 200

Number of apprenticeships completed

4, 22

new

11 500

Number of traineeships completed

4, 23

new

23 500

Number of school-based apprenticeships and traineeships completed

4, 24

new

4 000

Percentage of traineeships completed

 

58%

60%

Percentage of apprenticeships completed

 

67%

67%

Total competencies successfully completed:

1

 

 

  • VET (all)

1,14, 25

1.75M

1.78M

  • total TAFE

1

1.1M

1.1M

  • higher level training
    (Cert IV and above)

1

370 000

454 200

Percentage of successful competencies as a proportion of all attempted competencies

4, 25

new

89%

Employment/further study outcome for TAFE and VET providers

1

89%

87%

TAFE: non-government revenue ($)

1

137M

137M

Queensland's VET participation rate

 

10%

9%

Level of stakeholder satisfaction with VET training services and products:

 

 

 

  • Student Outcomes Survey

26

89%

89%

  • Survey of Employer Views

 

 

 

    • nationally recognised training

27

81%

83%

    • apprentices and trainees

27

84%

84%

Compliance of training organisations with the Australian Quality Training Framework:

1

 

 

  • total number of registered training organisations in Queensland

28

1 400

1 456

  • number of organisations approved for registration as a registered training organisation

29

217

297

  • number of qualifications approved for organisations upon achieving registration/renewal of registration

30

2 651

2 208

  • number of qualifications approved to be added to the scope of existing registered training organisations

30

2 687

3 379

Compliance with the provisions of departmental training contracts - number of training contracts audited

31

67

46

Proportion of VET activity delivered in regional Queensland

32

34%

39%

Average cost per competency successfully completed ($)

33

668

701

  • total TAFE

 

534

554

Total TAFE funding ($'000)

 

587 554

609 788

Higher education

Number of:

1

 

 

  • Queensland universities

 

9

9

  • other approved higher education providers

 

38

32

Number of students enrolled at Queensland universities:

1

 

 

  • total

 

195 000

196 800

  • international

 

48 400

49 200

Stakeholders' rating of departmental management of approval process:

 

 

 

  • percentage of applicants rating satisfactory or better

 

75%

92%

  • percentage of assessment panel members rating satisfactory or better

1

100%

100%

Number of applications for higher education courses:

1

 

 

  • new

 

40

41

  • re-accredited/re-approval

 

25

8

Percentage of students at Queensland universities located in:

1

 

 

  • Brisbane

 

60%

60%

  • other parts of Queensland

 

40%

40%

Source: Queensland State Budget 2010-11 Service Delivery Statements and State Training Agency Clearing House Database

Notes:

  1. Activity measures have been discontinued in the SDS to accurately reflect the government's transition to service standards with greater focus on efficiency and effectiveness.
  2. Student enrolments in state schools of distance education are distributed across the Early, Middle and Senior Phases of learning outputs according to year level.
  3. This measure is based on information provided by parents/caregivers and students in the School Opinion Survey, administered in all state schools in August 2009. Satisfaction is calculated as those respondents either satisfied or very satisfied.
  4. New service standards reflect the government's focus on efficiency and effectiveness.
  5. The estimated actual is an estimate and the errors bounds are not reported.
  6. This service standard is constructed from voluntary responses to the Next Step survey conducted in May 2009.
  7. This service standard does not separate students engaged in employment and/or education/training to ensure students are not counted more than once.
  8. These service standards are confined to only the state schooling sector.
  9. Now provided as average cost per student in (i) Prep and primary (ii) secondary and (iii) students with disabilities.
  10. New service standard introduced to disclose the estimated number of individuals who commenced, or are expected to commence, an apprenticeship or traineeship during the reporting period. Recent improvements in the economic situation are reflected in higher apprenticeship numbers.
  11. New service standard introduced indicates a small growth from an already high school-based apprenticeships and traineeships (SAT) base. Queensland currently has over 40% of Australia's SAT commencements.
  12. This measure records the estimated number of individuals aged 15 to 17 who commenced, or are expected to commence, an apprenticeship or traineeship during the reporting period.
  13. In-training numbers include continuing students from qualifications begun in previous years. The decline in apprentice commencements had a late effect on students in-training in 2009-10. However, this was partially offset by constant traineeship activity.
  14. Levels of institutional training activity are lower than projected, yet the number of qualifications completed and competencies successfully completed have improved.
  15. Southbank Institute of Technology (SBIT) and Gold Coast Institute of TAFE (GCIT) became statutory authorities in 2008. TAFE measures do not include SBIT and GCIT activity.
  16. This measure was changed in 2010-11 from students enrolled to students completing a Certificate III and above to track activity related to the Towards Q2: Tomorrow's Queensland target of 75 per cent of Queenslanders to achieve Certificate III or above by 2020.
  17. The number of Certificate III and above students and the number of Certificate IV and above students is a unique count of publicly funded VET system students in the current year.
  18. The success of Education and Training Reforms for the Future (ETRF) initiative, including young people in apprenticeships and traineeships (incorporating school-based apprentices and trainees) has contributed to the number of 15-17 year old students in 2009-10.
  19. New service standard introduced to disclosure the number of 15-19 year olds enrolled. This reflects Queensland's contribution to meeting the expectations of the National Youth Transitions Agreement.
  20. New service standard introduced to monitor the number of students completing a Certificate III and above. This has an immediate contribution to Queensland meeting Tomorrow's Queensland Smart target - three out four Queenslanders will hold trade, training or tertiary qualifications. Growth in Certificate III and above completions is a continuation of recent trends where students undertake and complete higher value courses.
  21. New service standard introduced to monitor the number of Indigenous students completing higher level courses. The increasing number is indicative of successful training support mechanisms that have been facilitated across the communities.
  22. New service standard introduced to monitor the number of apprenticeships completed. An increase in numbers reflects a history of higher commencements and higher retention rates.
  23. New service standard introduced to monitor the number of traineeships completed. An increase in numbers reflects a history of higher commencements and higher retention rates.
  24. New service standard introduced to monitor the number of SATs completed, including those school students that make the transition into a mainstream apprenticeship or traineeship after leaving school.
  25. The number of successfully completed competencies is expected to grow through increased enrolments in state and Australian Government initiatives, especially in the Certificate III and above levels consistent with Q2 targets. Students undertaking these courses complete more units of competency than those studying lower level courses. The student success rate has improved over the last few years and this is expected to continue.
  26. Student satisfaction is obtained from the annual National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Student Outcomes Survey using the measure for the percentage of VET graduates satisfied with the overall quality of their training.
  27. Employer satisfaction regarding VET is obtained from the biennial NCVER survey, Employers' Use and Views of the VET System.
  28. Includes information provided by the Queensland Studies Authority, but excludes other registered training organisations operating in Queensland under national registration.  While the target was calculated based on historical data and expected trends, actual performance is market driven.
  29. Approved for registration includes organisations registered for the first time and those organisations where registration is renewed. Includes information provided by the Queensland Studies Authority. While the target was calculated based on historical data and expected trends, actual performance is market driven.
  30. Includes information provided by the Queensland Studies Authority. While the target was calculated based on historical data and expected trends, actual performance is market driven.
  31. The target number of training contracts to be audited in 2009-10 has not been met as a direct result of scarce audit capacity being reprioritised in response to an increase in registration applications. This reprioritisation has allowed registration applications to be processed faster, enabling registered training organisations to commence training earlier than would otherwise have been possible.
  32. The department aims to ensure the percentage of VET activity delivered to regional Queensland is commensurate with the proportion of 15-64 year olds.
  33. Service standard represents the average cost to the department of purchasing each successful training competency. Movement to higher level courses, in line with the Queensland Skills Plan and Q2 goals, is expected to result in an increase in the cost per successfully completed competency.

^ Top of page

Senior Phase of Learning

Table 16: Number of state school students in the Senior Phase of Learning

State school students - Senior Phase of Learning (Years 10-12)

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Total number of students

94 980

95 580

97 940

100 720

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

Figure 27: Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Senior Phase of Learning (Years 10-12)

Satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Senior Phase of Learning (Years 10-12)

Graph outlining satisfaction of parents with their child's school - Senior Phase of Learning (Years 10-12)

Source: School Opinion Survey - Department of Education and Training

Figure 28: Apparent retention rates of Queensland and Australian students in Years 10-12, 2006-09

Apparent retention rates of Queensland and Australian students in Years 10-12, 2006-09

Graph showing trend in retention rates of Queensland and Australian students in Years 10-12, 2006-09

Source: ABS unpublished data

Figure 29: Number of 15- to 19-year-olds employed full-time, not attending full-time education ('000) - Queensland

Number of 15- to 19-year-olds employed full-time, not attending full-time education ('000) - Queensland

Graph showing trend in number of 15- to 19-year-olds employed full-time, not attending full-time education ('000) - Queensland 2005-2009

Source: ABS Labour Force Australia (Catalogue No. 6202.0) various years

Table 17: Percentage of all Year 12 students who received a QCE or Certificate III or above VET qualification in 2009

Measure

State schools

Non-state schools

All schools

QCE or Cert III or above qualification

71.9

89.2

78.9

Source: Queensland Studies Authority

Table 18: Number of Year 12 Queensland school students with disabilities who have achieved the QCIA in 2009

Achievement:

Number

Studentsin state schools who achieved a QCIA in 2009

496

Students in non-state schools awarded a QCIA in 2009 st

61

Total

557

Source: 2010-11 Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements (Department of Education and Training and Queensland Studies Authority)

Figure 30: Percentage of Year 12 Queensland students with an OP 1-15 or International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD)

Percentage of Year 12 Queensland students with an OP 1-15 or International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD)

Graph showing percentage trend of Year 12 Queensland students with an OP 1-15 or International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD)

Source: Queensland Studies Authority

Note: IBD award has been included in this data since 2008

Figure 31: Main destinations of Year 12 completers, Queensland, 2010

Main destinations of Year 12 completers, Queensland, 2010

Pie graph of main destinations of Year 12 completers, Queensland, 2010

Source: 2010 Next Step Survey

Figure 32: Number of secondary school students commencing a SAT since the 2006 base year

Number of secondary school students commencing a SAT since the 2006 base year

Bar graph showing numbers of secondary school students commencing a SAT since the 2006 base year

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 33: Percentage of Year 12 students from state and non-state schools with a SAT - complete or completing

Percentage of Year 12 students from state and non-state schools with a SAT - complete or completing

Graph showing percentage of all Year 12 students who have completed or are completing an apperenticeship or traineeship

Source: Queensland Studies Authority

Figure 34: Uptake of school-based apprentices and trainees by industry of employment" title="Uptake of school-based apprentices and trainees by industry of employment

Uptake of school-based apprentices and trainees by industry of employment

Bar graph of school-based apprentice and trainee uptake by industry of employment

Source: Department of Education and Training

Notes:

  1. Calendar year 2009 only
  2. Includes the seven industries with the highest number of commencements

^ Top of page

VET participation

Figure 35: Number of apprentice and trainee commencements

Number of apprentice and trainee commencements

Graph of trends in nunmbers of apprentice and trainee commencements 2005-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 36: Percentage of Year 12 students from state and non-state schools with a VET qualification

Percentage of Year 12 students from state and non-state schools with a VET qualification

Graph showing percentage of all Year 12 students completing a VET qualification 2006-2009

Source: Queensland Studies Authority

Figure 37: Proportion of 20- to 24-year-olds having attained Year 12 or equivalent or Certificate II (both state and nonstate schools)

Proportion of 20- to 24-year-olds having attained Year 12 or equivalent or Certificate II (both state and nonstate schools)

Graph showing trend in proportion of 20 - 24-year-olds having attained Year 12 or equivalent or Certificate II

Source: ABS Education and Work Australia May 2009 (Catalogue No. 6227.0) (Additional Datacube)

Figure 38: Proportion of 25- to 64-year-olds with Certificate III or higher qualifications

Proportion of 25- to 64-year-olds with Certificate III or higher qualifications

Graph showing trend in proportion of 25 - 64-year-olds with Certificate III or higher qualifications

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 39: Number of apprentices and trainees in training

Number of apprentices and trainees in training

Graph showing number of apprentice and trainee commencements

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 40: Number of apprentice and trainee completions

Number of apprentice and trainee completions

Graph showing number of apprentice and trainee completions

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 41: Full year training equivalents in Recognition of Prior Learning - Queensland's position relative to Australia, 2005-09

Full year training equivalents in Recognition of Prior Learning - Queensland's position relative to Australia, 2005-09

Graph showing comparative data for participation in Recognition of Prior Learning - Queensland's position relative to Australia, 2005-09

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Note: Full time training equivalents measure the training activity undertaken by a student on a full-time basis for one year. Calculations are based on hours of delivery (720 hours = 1 FYTE)

Table 19: Level of student satisfaction with VET training services and products, 2006-09

2006

2007

2008

2009

Queensland

89%

89%

88%

89%

Australia

88%

89%

89%

89%

Source: Student Outcome Survey - NCVER

Table 20: Level of employer satisfaction with apprentices and trainees

2005

2007

2009

Queensland

81%

84%

84%

Australia

79%

83%

83%

Source: Employers' Use and Views of the VET System - NCVER

Figure 42: Outcomes of audits of registered training organisations

Outcomes of audits of registered training organisations

Pie graph showing outcomes of audits of registered training organisations

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 43: Number of TAFE qualifications awarded at Certificate I and above

Number of TAFE qualifications awarded at Certificate I and above

Graphs showing VET qualifications awarded at Certificate I and above

Source: Department of Education and Training

Note: Many private providers reported their non-government funded training through the department's databases in 2009-10. This private provider fee for service training activity is not within the departmental reporting scope. A nationally developed protocol for separating this out-of-scope activity has not yet been built into the department's database. In lieu of reporting total VET qualifications that are not comparable to previous years, this year a trend for TAFE only is shown. In scope, private provider certificate level qualifications are estimated at 27 000.

Table 21: Total number of VET qualifications awarded - all qualification levels

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

96 947

92 820

109 921

112 400

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 44: Statistical trends for Cert IV and above students

Statistical trends for Cert IV and above students

Graphs showing trends in activity of students in Cert IV and above

Source: Department of Education and Training

^ Top of page

Indigenous education, training and skilling

Figure 45: Apparent retention rates for Indigenous students in Years 10-12, 2006-09 - Queensland & Australia

Apparent retention rates for Indigenous students in Years 10-12, 2006-09 - Queensland & Australia

Graph comparing retention rates for Indigenous students in Years 10-12, 2006-09 - Queensland & Australia

Source: ABS unpublished data

Note: Qld state and non-state schools Indigenous students cf Aust state and non-state schools Indigenous students

Figure 46: Number of Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee commencements

Number of Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee commencements

Graph showing trends in Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee commencements 2006-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 47: Number of Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee completions

Number of Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee completions

Graph showing trends in numbers of Indigenous school-based apprentice and trainee completions 2006-2009

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 48: Main destinations of Indigenous Year 12 completers - Queensland 2010

Main destinations of Indigenous Year 12 completers - Queensland 2010

Pie chart outlining main destinations of Queensland Indigenous Year 12 from 2009

Source: 2010 Next Step Survey

Figure 49: Number of Indigenous apprentice and trainee commencements

Number of Indigenous apprentice and trainee commencements

Graph showing trends in numbers of Indigenous apprentice and trainee commencements 2005-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Figure 50: Number of Indigenous apprentice and trainee completions

Number of Indigenous apprentice and trainee completions

Graph showing trends in number of Indigenous apprentice and trainee completions 2005 - 2010

Source: Department of Education and Training - Contract of Training Database (DELTA)

Table 22: Module/competency completion rates of Indigenous apprentices and trainees

 

2006

2007

2008

2009

Successful completion of modules/competencies

91.1%

93.7%

92.9%

92.7%

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 51: Number of Indigenous students in the publicly funded VET system

Number of Indigenous students in the publicly funded VET system

Graph showing trends in number of Indigenous students in the publicly funded VET system 2005-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 52: Number of VET qualifications awarded to Indigenous students in Queensland

Number of VET qualifications awarded to Indigenous students in Queensland

Graph showing trends in number of VET qualifications awarded to Indigenous students in Queensland 2005-2010

Source: Department of Education and Training

^ Top of page

Higher education

Table 23: Activity within higher education

Higher education

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

Total number of students enrolled in Queensland universities

187 533

190 660

195 000

196 800

International students enrolled in Queensland universities

49 400

50 289

48 400

49 200

Number of applications for new courses

23

33

14

41

Number of applications for courses to be re-accredited or re-approved

41

23

12

8

Percentage of students at Queensland universities in Brisbane

60%

60%

60%

60%

Percentage of students at Queensland universities located outside of Brisbane

40%

40%

40%

40%

Source: Queensland State Budget - Service Delivery Statements, Department of Education and Training

^ Top of page

Workforce planning, attraction and retention

Figure 53: The department's workforce composition 2009-10

The department's workforce composition 2009-10

Bar graph showing department's workforce composition by employment category

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 54: Location of the department's workforce 2009-10

Location of the department's workforce 2009-10

Pie graph showing location of the department's workforce 2009-10

Source: Department of Education and Training

Figure 55: The department's age profile 2009-10

The department's age profile 2009-10

Bar graph showing the department's age profile 2009-10

Source: Department of Education and Training

Table 24: Representation of women and men in DET disaggregated by annual earnings, 2009-10

Earnings groupings

Female

Male

Total FTEs

Female

Male

29 999 and less

17.7

14.1

31.8

55.6%

44.4%

30 000 - 39 999

1858.8

473.2

2332.0

79.7%

20.3%

40 000 - 49 999

11 576.2

2 688.4

14 264.6

81.12%

18.8%

50 000 - 59 999

8099.5

2 354.1

10 453.6

77.5%

22.5%

60 000 - 69 999

6156.2

2 355.5

8 511.7

72.3%

27.7%

70 000 - 79 999

15 648.8

5 980.7

21 629.5

72.4%

27.6%

80 000 - 89 999

2 813.2

1551.7

4 364.8

64.5%

35.5%

90 000 - 99 999

1 531.9

1127.6

2 659.5

57.6%

42.4%

100 000 - 109 999

279.3

362.2

641.5

43.5%

56.5%

110 000 - 119 999

264.3

322.7

587.0

45.0%

55.0%

120 000 and over

159.7

193.4

354.0

45.2%

54.7%

Source: Public Service Commission

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Workforce diversity

Figure 56: Professional development expenditure, 2009-10

Professional development expenditure, 2009-10

Pie graph outlining professional development expenditure, 2009-10

Source: Department of Education and Training

Table 25: Workforce diversity - equity group representation

Equity group

Percentage of workforce as at 30 June 2010 (%)

Women in non-teaching senior management positions (SES/SO)

45.0

Women in non-teaching management positions (A07 level and above)

55.3

Women in teaching positions (Band 5 and above)

58.8

Women in teaching positions (Bands 8-11)

38.9

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

1.9

People from non-English speaking backgrounds

9.2

People with a disability

5.8

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Human resource management

Figure 57: Short-term absenteeism rate for Queensland state school teachers, 2009-10

Short-term absenteeism rate for Queensland state school teachers, 2009-10

Graph outling short-term absenteeism rate for Queensland state school teachers, 2009-10

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Environmental sustainability

Table 26: 2009-10 CO2 emissions by category

Activity

Gross greenhouse gas emissions
(tonnes of CO2)

Less emission offsets
(tonnes of CO2)

NET greenhouse gas emissions
(tonnes of CO2)

Explanatory notes

Vehicle use

  • QFleet leased vehicles

4275

171

4104

1

  • Hired vehicles

441

441

-

2

Electricity consumption

  • Purchased directly from an electricity retailer

251 759

353

251 406

3

  • Sourced through a third party

4993

322

4 672

4

Air travel

  • Domestic air travel on commercial airlines

2179

2179

-

5

  • International air travel on commercial airlines

696

696

-

5

Source: Department of Public Works

Notes:

  1. The emissions figure has been aggregated using National Greenhouse Emissions Reporting (NGER) guidelines and represents emissions for four primary fuel types: unleaded petrol, diesel, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and E10. Emissions shown are estimates based on actual kilometres travelled and available fuel consumption records. The emission offsets figure relates to purchased national Greenhouse Friendly™ certified carbon offsets for vehicles that did not comply with the minimum Greenhouse Vehicle Guide (GVG) ratings.
  2. The hire car vehicle emissions attributable to Avis Australia vehicles booked under the Standing Offer Arrangement managed by the Queensland Government Chief Procurement Office have been calculated by Avis Australia. The emission offsets figure relates to purchased national Greenhouse Friendly™ certified carbon offsets.
  3. This emissions figure is based on available building-related electricity consumption records for the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. For these records, the emissions reported are limited to those linked to electricity purchased directly from an energy retailer for this department's own buildings and any space it leases. Incomplete electricity consumption records have been extrapolated where necessary. The electricity consumption has then been converted to carbon emissions using the combined Scope 2 and Scope 3 conversion factor of 1.01 kg CO2-e/kWh as published in the Australian Government's National Greenhouse Accounts Factors Workbook (June 2009).

    The emission offsets figure includes GreenPower accredited renewable energy procured through Ecofund by the Department of Public Works on behalf of each department. The process involved the centralised bulk purchase of Queensland-based GreenPower Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), and subsequently surrendering them to the Australian Government's Office of the Renewable Energy Regulator.
  4. This emissions figure is based on emissions associated with electricity use in leased spaces where the electricity is not directly purchased by the tenant department from an energy retailer eg. where the electricity costs form part of lease charges.

    This figure includes estimated consumption (where specific details aren't available) and actual electricity records received from government and private sector landlords. Incomplete electricity consumption records have been apportioned and/or extrapolated where necessary. For example, in those major government office buildings owned by the Department of Public Works and do not have separate electricity sub-metering for tenants, the electricity consumption and associated emissions have been apportioned 45% to the landlord, and 55% to the tenants - in line with industry practice and historical benchmarking.

    The emission offsets figure includes GreenPower accredited renewable energy procured through Ecofund by the Department of Public Works on behalf of each department.
  5. Air travel includes all flights recorded by the Queensland Government Chief Procurement Office (QGCPO) during the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010, specifically:
    international air travel on commercial airlines; and domestic air travel on commercial airlines. For all air travel the following methodology is used. QGCPO calculates the kilometres flown from data provided. The kilometre figure is divided by 100 and multiplied by an industry average number of litres of fuel burnt per passenger per 100 kms. A factor of 5 has been used for all air travel (sourced from the International Civil Aviation Organisation). The use of this method gives the average litres of fuel burnt for a flight, per passenger. This figure is subsequently converted from litres into kilograms and then from kilograms into tonnes, before being multiplied by 3.157 (which represents the amount of CO2 tonnes produced by burning one tonne of aviation fuel sourced from the International Civil Aviation Organisation).

    The emission offsets figure for air travel relates to purchased national Greenhouse Friendly™ certified carbon offsets.

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Information and communication technologies (ICT)

Figure 58: Satisfaction with access to computer technology

Satisfaction with access to computer technology

Bar graph showing comparative satisfaction with access to computer technology of parents,students and staff

Source: Department of Education and Training

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Planning, reporting and continuous improvement

Table 27: Expenditure on consultancies, 2009-10

Category

Expenditure ($)

Finance/accounting

$130 837

Human resource management

$324 450

Information technology

$88 904

Legal services

$51 466

Management

  • Corporate management projects
$452 072
  • Teaching, learning and curriculum projects

$152 118

Professional/technical

$86 511

Total consultancy expenditure

$1 286 358

Source: Department of Education and Training

Table 28: Right to Information data

RTI/IP statistics

2009-10

Applications received during 2009-10

272

Applications finalised during 2009-10 (including applications received during 2008-09 which were finalised in 2009-10)

247

Source: Department of Education and Training

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